ABOUT THE BILLS

House Bill 399 and Senate Bill 245 seek to significantly reduce the number of clock hours required for licensure as a cosmetologist/barber from 1,500/1,800 hours to 1000 hours. Currently a newly licensed cosmetologist/barber in the State of Ohio can seek licensure in 30 states without the need of investing in any additional education. If HB-399/SB-245 becomes law, that same newly licensed cosmetologist/barber would lose reciprocity with most of the country.

The proponents of this bill claim that the current licensure requirements are overburdensome and that lowering hour requirements will lead to less debt. No one will argue that less debt is a bad thing, however HB-399/SB-245 doesn’t make cosmetology or barbering education any cheaper, it simply removes half of the education. Buying a car for 50% off seems like a great deal until you realize that the car you bought is missing half of its parts.

Support the beauty industry and beauty professionals by making sure that education and licensure standards are not lowered in order for a few large companies to make a few more bucks. Protect my profession.

Please sign the both petitions for House Bill 399 and Senate Bill 245.

HOUSE BILL PETITION

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SENATE BILL PETITION

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THE PROBLEM WITH APPRENTICESHIPS

WHAT THE BILLS PROPOSE

House Bill 399 and Senate Bill 245 create an entire apprenticeship program with no standards, no curriculum, no proof of education, no experience needed or standards for instructors to actually be qualified to teach. This apprenticeship program seeks to replace proven educational techniques and processes with apprenticeships that lack consistency and accountability.

Current education standards produce graduates empowered to start their own businesses. In fact, in 2018, 75% of barbers and 44% of hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists were self-employed.1

1Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Barbers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists, on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/barbers-hairstylists-and-cosmetologists.htm (visited November 08, 2019).

THE CASE AGAINST APPRENTICESHIPS

NO STANDARDS FOR CURRICULUM

HB-399/SB-245 do not spell out what an Apprentice learns, how many different techniques, any information about the rigor and quality of the program and no information whatsoever.

 

NO STANDARDS FOR EDUCATORS

HB-399/SB-245 require no training whatsoever in instruction techniques, curriculum preparation, and education.

 

A RECORD OF FAILURE

Ohio experimented with barbering apprenticeship, results so poor that the program was discontinued for inconsistent instruction, lack of diverse skillset, failure to understand infection control, and public safety procedures due to very poorly trained professionals.

 

NO STANDARDS FOR EXPERIENCE

Under HB 399/SB-245, an Apprentice can be cleaning the shop or salon all day long and not be trained in any technique.

 

NO ACCOUNTABILITY

Unlike schools, apprenticeships offer no reporting of hours.

 

INAPT COMPARISON

Proponents of HB-399/SB-245 would have you believe that because apprenticeship programs such as the programs run by labor unions for professions like construction work that they will work for beauty professionals. However those programs are multi-million-dollar rigorous programs with strong content, trained instructors, years of training, rigorous classroom instruction, and last longer than Ohio’s cosmetology and barber standards for education.

 

SALONS CONTROL HOW MUCH YOU LEARN

Apprentices only learn what one person or one limited branch of the profession teach them. Some of the salons will only teach so much so as to keep licensees working for them and not branch out on their own. The less you know, the less likely you are to compete against this model. It is a recipe for low wages, inconsistent education, lack of professionalism.

 

LIMITED SKILLSET

If you are apprenticed at a chain salon that features 15-minute haircuts and only 6 styles of haircuts, what future do you have in the industry? You are doomed to low wage, low satisfaction careers with the obvious high drop out rates due to these factors.

 

CREATES EMPLOYEES, NOT ENTREPRENEURS

Apprenticeships do not provide for a well-rounded professional who can go out and start their own business. It will stifle a vibrant industry and the creativity that drives the industry.

THE CASE FOR CURRENT RULES

PROVEN CURRICULUM

Current education rules offer rigorous, well-rounded, proven education that produces productive and talented professionals using evidence-based, nationally accredited curriculum.

 

TIME-TESTED INSTRUCTION

Tests mirror the curriculum of time-tested textbooks and instruction approved by the board.

 

A RECORD OF SUCCESS

High first-time passage rates prove that the curriculum works to produce a talented workforce that is prepared to own their own business, provide competent and extraordinary services in a safe and highly-skilled manner.

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SAVE RECIPROCITY

RECIPROCITY PETITION
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WHAT IS RECIPROCITY?

Support the beauty industry and beauty professionals by making sure that education and licensure standards are not lowered in order for a few large companies to make a few more bucks. Protect my profession.

Please sign the petition to save License Reciprocity.

BORDERING STATE RECIPROCITY RULES

INDIANA

Barbering – 1,500 hours
Cosmetology – 1,500 hours

Nail Technician – 450 hours
Esthetician – 700 hours

RECIPROCITY RULES

For Cosmetology and Barbering, the state or country you hold a license in must require at least 1500 hours of education or one (1) year of licensed practice is equal to one hundred (100) hours of education to an applicant who has completed a minimum of one thousand (1000) hours of education. The jurisdiction must also require at least 70% passing on the written and practical exams.

For Esthetics, the state or country you hold a license in must require at least 700 hours of education. If not, One (1) year of licensed practice may substitute for one hundred (100) hours of education to an applicant who has completed a minimum of 400 hours of education.

What it means: It would take 5 years of work experience to transfer a license to Indiana, with only 1000 hours of education.

If an applicant comes from a jurisdiction that issues a cosmetologist, barbering or esthetics license but does not meet Indiana’s minimum reciprocity requirements, they may transfer their hours from their original out-of-state school to a beauty culture school in Indiana. The applicant would need to graduate from the Indiana approved beauty culture school and then apply by examination. Beauty culture schools may accept hours from an out-of-state school, but are not required by the board to do so.

The number of hours reflects the applicant’s state’s minimum education requirement rather than the actual number of hours that were obtained. If the applicant completed extra hours above and beyond the state’s minimum requirement, the extra hours would not apply

What it means: Out-of-state hours are not required by the board to be accepted. The ability of a school to offer additional training in Roegner’s bill, would not enable those hours to transfer, as they would not be certified by the state.

KENTUCKY

Barbering – 1,500 hours
Cosmetology – 1,500 hours

Nail Technician – 450 hours
Esthetician – 750 hours

RECIPROCITY RULES

If the applicant’s hours obtained out-of state are equivalent to Kentucky’s hourly requirement then the applicant will apply as an Out-of-State Exam applicant.

If the applicant does not have enough hours to match Kentucky’s hourly requirement the applicant must complete remaining hours required for that license in a school of cosmetology in Kentucky before applying for the licensing exam.

What it means: Kentucky will only accept the amount of hours the state you are transferring from requires for licensing. (Example: Florida requires 1250 hours to be licensed as a cosmetologist – that is the maximum amount of hours that we will accept from that state). So, no optional education as per Roegner’s bill.

Any person who holds an out-of-state license and gained licensure by a nationally certified examination may apply for licensure without completing the NIC examination in Kentucky.  Approved transfers will not be required to complete an examination for licensure in the state of Kentucky.

Any person who holds an out-of-state license that did not complete a nationally certified examination to obtain licensure in the transferring state will be required to successfully complete the NIC examination, theory and practical, before licensure will be granted in Kentucky.

Barber reciprocity: Section 1. (1) Any person who is at least eighteen (18) years of age and of good moral character and temperate habits, who has a current license or certificate of registration as a practicing barber of another state or other board recognizing authority, which has substantially the same requirements for licensing or registering barbers as are required of KRS Chapter 317 and 201 KAR Chapter 14,shall, upon payment of the fee required by 201 KAR 14:180,be granted permission to take an examination to determine his fitness to receive a license to practice barbering.

Section 2. If an applicant is coming from a state or other board recognizing authority without substantially the same requirements, the applicant shall have been a registered barber and worked for three (3) years, in accordance with KRS 317.450(1)(e).(KBB:Lic:Non-Res-1; 1 Ky.R. 725; Am. 1224; eff. 5-14-1975; 10 Ky.R. 893; eff. 2-1-1984; 40 Ky.R. 1861; 2414; eff. 6-6-2014.)

The number of hours reflects the applicant’s state’s minimum education requirement rather than the actual number of hours that were obtained. If the applicant completed extra hours above and beyond the state’s minimum requirement, the extra hours would not apply

WEST VIRGINIA

Barbering – 1,200 hours
Cosmetology – 1,800 hours
Nail Technician – 400 hours

Esthetician – 600 hours
Hair Stylist – 1,000 hours

RECIPROCITY RULES

Training must equal or exceed the requirements for a West Virginia license.  The West Virginia Board will accept actual licensed work experience in lieu of part of the required training. Work experience is awarded at 25 hours per month of salon work, or 300 hours per year. Total work experience that may be accepted cannot exceed 50% of the required hours, and must have been acquired within the previous five years.

What it means: It would require 2 years and 8 months of work experience in Ohio to transfer a 1000 clock hour license to WV.

PENNSYLVANIA

Barbering – 1,250 hours
Cosmetology – 1,250 hours

Nail Technician – 200 hours
Esthetician – 300 hours

RECIPROCITY RULES

The Pennsylvania Board of Cosmetology and the Pennsylvania Board of Barber Examiners requires all candidates to submit an official Criminal History Record Information check with their applications for licensure examinations, reactivation, and reciprocity.

Applicants will need to supply an official Criminal History Record Information check from the State Police or other state agency for every state in which the candidate has resided during the past five years. The reports must be dated within ninety (90) days of the date of the application.

Reciprocity agreements are subject to change, so please contact the board to review the requirements: www.dos.state.pa.us/cosmet.

What it means: If you hold a current license in a state where Pennsylvania DOES NOT have an understanding of reciprocity you are required to take and pass the combined theory/procedural skill computer based exam. Please complete and submit a cosmetology application and review the instructions.

MICHIGAN

Barbering – 1,800 hours
Cosmetology – 1,500 hours

Nail Technician – 400 hours
Esthetician – 400 hours

RECIPROCITY RULES

Sec. 1211.

(1) Upon submission of an application to the department, an individual licensed to perform cosmetology services under the laws of another state shall, without examination, be granted a license to practice the services for which that individual was previously licensed if the applicant is not less than 17 years of age, is of good moral character, and the requirements for registration or licensure in the particular state were substantially equal to the requirements then in force in this state.

(2) Years or months of experience may be substituted for hours of training in a ratio of 100 hours of training credited for each 6 months of experience. An individual applying for licensure having qualifications acquired outside of the United States shall provide proof of training or experience, or both. The department may determine whether or not an applicant is qualified to be licensed without examination.

What it means: Under the proposed changes, two and a half years of work in a salon would be necessary to transfer an Ohio cosmetology license to Michigan.

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