WHAT IS HB-399

House Bill 399 seeks to significantly reduce the number of clock hours required for licensure as a cosmetologist from 1500 hours to 1000 hours. Currently a newly licensed cosmetologist in the State of Ohio can seek licensure in 30 states without the need of investing in any additional education. If HB-399 becomes law, that same newly licensed cosmetologist would be left with only two states (New York and Massachusetts) to transfer to without further investment in education.

The proponents of this bill claim that the current licensure requirements are overburdensome and that lowering hour requirements will lead to less debt. No one will argue that less debt is a bad thing, however HB-399 doesn’t make cosmetology education any cheaper, it simply removes half of the education. Buying a car for 50% off seems like a great deal until you realize that the car you bought is missing half of its parts.

Support the beauty industry and beauty professionals by making sure that education and licensure standards are not lowered in order for a few large companies to make a few more bucks. Protect my profession.

Please sign the petition for House Bill 399.

HB-399 PETITION

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WHAT IS THE IMPACT OF HB-399?

IMPACT ON STUDENTS

  • Takes 1/2 of a student’s education out of the hands of passionate professional educators and puts that burden on salons.
  • Salons also do not have to meet the regulatory standards that accredited cosmetology programs must meet in order to ensure that the school is providing the education needed for a student to be successful. The lack of regulatory standards would result in inconsistent quality of education.
  • Reduced hours will not give students enough time in classroom or in clinic to learn both the safety/sanitation and the technical skills necessary to be employment ready upon graduation.
  • Fewer cosmetology hours could mean that the skincare and esthetics portions of cosmetology education would not get an adequate amount of time during the truncated program.
  • Fewer salons can afford to shoulder the financial burden of an educational program, meaning there will be fewer employment opportunities for graduates.

DISPROPORTIONATE IMPACT ON WOMEN

  • Nearly 95% of beauty professionals and 85% of licensed cosmetologists are women, while women represent only 47% of the workers in all US industries.
  • Women own 61% of independent salons, whereas women own only 30% of businesses in all private sectors.
  • Proponents of HB-399 argue that the “common sense reforms are necessary to position the Ohio cosmetology industry for survival,” but the truth is that passage of HB-399 will result in the closure of numerous female owned businesses.

IMPACT ON LICENSE PORTABILITY

  • Newly licensed cosmetologists in Ohio can currently seek licensure in 30 states without the need of investing in any additional education.
  • HB-399 would reduce that same cosmetologist’s opportunities to only two states, New York and Massachusetts.

IMPACT ON SMALL BUSINESS

  • “Mom and Pop” salons cannot afford to hire a graduate then pay someone to finish their education without the deep pockets of larger chain salons.
  • Salon owners and operators will be forced to divert their energy and resoruces from running the business and servicing clients to educating new employees.
  • Nearly 2/3 of salons and spas are small, independently-owned entrepreneurial businesses that employ less than 5 people and operate on an incredibly moderate profit margin of less than 10%.
  • Sub HB-189/SB-129 would force these small, independent businesses to absorb an additional cost of $5,000 to $8,000 per new hire to replace training that is currently provided to each newly licensed beauty professional in Ohio.
  • Small businesses are forced to either spend money to finish a graduate’s education or to spend more money hiring more senior stylists who are already experienced.
  • The proponents of HB-399 are owners, franchisees or officers of large, chain salon operations that stand to benefit from the demise of the small, independently-owned salon and spa who cannot bear the increased financial burden.

IMPACT ON CONSUMERS

  • Students will have less experience with the technical skills needed, possibly leading to unsatisfactory results.
  • Client safety could be at risk by having graduates with only a minimal amount of education on safety and sanitation.
  • Graduates lack of adequate experience will result in slower service and longer appointments for customers.
  • Added expense of education could result in a price increase for services.

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HB-399 PETITION

Dear Senator

**your signature**

1 signature

Share this with your friends:

   

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION ABOVE.